I wouldn’t rate white bread as my favorite. I still like to bake it occasionally, to mix up my diet and to have new challenges in my baking, but the breads I’m the most fond of though are definitely breads which include some whole grain, some seeds . . . which are overall somewhat nutritious. This kind of bread is what I like as everyday-breads.

I think, the bread I’m about to introduce here, definitely falls into this category. It is a German Bread called the “Herbstsonne” (eng: autumn sun) because of its tipical scoring. I had again some problems with the bread’s height, I made a very wet dough (therefore I adjusted the amount of water in the recipe below) and wasn’t able to shape it well. I let it proof well, so when I scored it it deflated to much after my taste and didn’t get an extraordinary oven spring. Next time, I’d probably bake it as it is or just score a cross in the middle.


The source of this recipe is the German food community called chefkoch.de. I adapted it a little bit to work with the flours I’ve got on hand.

Herbstsonne

liquid levain
30 g mature culture
165 g rye flour (I used a medium rye, something inbetween white and whole grain rye)
165 g water

soaker
33 g oats
33 g sunflower seeds
23 g flaxseeds
90 g water
10 g salt

final dough
all but 30 grams of the liquid levain
all of the soaker
166 g rye flour
66 g whole-grain rye flour
80 g water (adjust amount as required)

flaxseeds and oats

  1. 1. mix the ingredients for the liquid levain, set aside until it’s ripe
  2. at the same time, mix the ingredients for the soaker, put in the fridge
  3. Mix the soaker, the liquid levain and the remaining flour and water together, knead in a mixer three minutes on low speed, then three minutes on somewhat higher speed.
  4. let the dough rest for 30 minutes.
  5. shape into a round boule (it’s sticky!), if required, wet the dough a little bit so that the flaxseeds and oats can “glue” to the boule (roll the boule in the flaxseeds/oats mixture). Put the boule into a floured proofing basket.
  6. let the dough proof – I retarded it in the fridge: I kept it in the fridge for about twelve hours, and let it finish proofing at air temperature for about another two hours. I poked the dough and it reacted slowly.
  7. I dropped the dough gently on a baking sheet and scored it like a sun. (What I wouldn’t do the next time, because it deflated the dough to much in my opinion.)
  8. Baking: 20 min at 230°C, another 25 minutes at 210°C, then I turned the oven off, opened the door and let the  bread in there for another 10 minutes.
  9. Let cool overnight.

There’s a lot of flavor in this bread! It’s very moist, of course it’s not airy like a white bread, but that’s not what I was looking for anyway. I remember that it had a very good keeping quality the last time I baked it, which isn’t surprising because of the soaker.

I used some slices for a sandwich today, which I stuffed with lettuce and a home made cottage-cheese-dried-tomato-spread. Yumm! (the spread is very easy. Take some spoonfulls of cottage cheese, cut some tomatoes (the kind in the oil) into pieces, add some salt and pepper, some basil if you’ve got it on hand, and a tiny bit of honey and mix it briefly. tadaa!)

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