Of course I had a look at this week’s yeastspotting. And there I spotted this: Barley-Flatbread by Dan Lepard. It looks gorgeous, doesn’t it?

I’ve ever since I lived in Sweden for a year been fond of flatbreads, crackers, crispbread. There, crispbread or as they say, “Knäckebröd”, is a staple food. They’ve got an endless variety and have it with every meal.

Here in Switzerland flatbread exists as well, but only in a limited choice. I prefer to bake my own, so I decided that it’s time again. I didn’t follow Dan Lepard’s formula though, I made up my own!

I am very pleased with the outcome. I wanted that the oat-flavor really comes out, and I achieved this goal. I love the mildness of these crackers! They turned out wonderfully crisp and light. I’m sure that they won’t last long, the next time I’ll make double the recipe. (I always work with small amounts when I’m experimenting because I hate to throw things out.)

It’s actually pretty easy. I think if you haven’t got a grain mill at home or you can’t get your hands on whole-grain oat flour, you could probably blend some oats so that it resembles flour somewhat. I used very coarse flour as well, so I’d say that should work. No guarantee though, I haven’t tried it myself!

Whole-grain Oat Crackers

liquid levain

15 g mature starter

60 g coarsely ground oat

60 g water

soaker

75 g coarsely ground oat

10 g whole-grain rye flour

75 g milk (I used skimmed milk)

4 g salt

final dough

all of the soaker

all of the liquid levain

50 g of whole-wheat flour

oats to sprinkle

  1. mix the ingredients for the liquid levain the evening before you bake.
  2. combine the ingredients for the soaker at the same time
  3. the next morning, mix the soaker and the liquid levain with the whole wheat flour and knead for about five minutes. Don’t expect any gluten to form, it will remain a rather “grainy” ball. The dough is not sticky or tacky.
  4. put the dough into a small bowl, transfer it into a plastic bag. Let it rest for about half an hour in a warm environment. (In my case the microwave with the light on and the door somewhat open.)
  5. roll the doughevenly to around 3  mm thick. brush sparingly with water, sprinkle with oats and roll again, to around 2 mm thick. I used my old pasta dough machine for that.
  6. Place the dough on a baking sheet with a parchement paper. cut into rectangles as desired, let it proof uncovered for one hour.
  7. bake one baking sheet in turn in 230°C for about 12 minutes, or until the edges are brown. Turn the rectangles upside down after a couple minutes.
  8. let cool on a rack and store in an airtight box when they’ve cooled down.

I’m sending this to Susan for yeastspotting.

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